Tag Archives: Black Creek Pioneer Village

We’re (Almost) Back!

Greetings, Beer-Lovers!

This is just a quick note to remind you all that Black Creek Pioneer Village’s 2017 season begins on Saturday, April 29th, 2017. It’s Canada’s 150th birthday, and we are ready to party like it’s 1867!

Check out the Black Creek website for a whole slew of special events happening this year, and make sure to see our Canada Day event details on Facebook! And of course, we’ll have new programming and activities rolling out throughout the season!

Photo de Black Creek Pioneer Village.

Did someone say, “Historic trades and activities, History Actors, musicians, animals, Discovery Stations, Pioneer Day Camps, and more?” I’m pretty sure someone said ALL of that! 😉

Down in the brewery, Ed has also been preparing. I won’t give too much away right now, but rest assured  – we’ve got the sesquicentennial well in hand!

And if your stocks of historic beer are a little low after the long winter – well, you can always swing by the brewery to pick up more historic brew. Ed will be back brewing on weekends, so feel free to come say, “Hi!”

Getting excited? So are we – so until Saturday, here are some pictures we love.

Coming through the hop garden one summer morning.

 

Our beautiful mill…

Photo de Black Creek Pioneer Village.

Our campers having fun!

 

Hard at work!

 

Our lambs are skipping!

 

And of course…

To Queen and Country!

Katie

Leave a comment

Filed under Craft Beer

Announcing Our 2017 Specialty Beers!

Greetings, beer-lovers!

As many of you know, Ed supplements our standard beer roster with a monthly specialty beer! These seasonal brews are limited releases. They tend to come out around the holidays, and when they are gone, they are gone!

So what’s on tap for this year?

May – Apricot Ale

A fruity pale ale, perfect for taking along to your Victoria Day celebrations!

Image by Fir0002

 

June – Ginger Ale

This is not for kids! A 5% light amber ale made with real ginger. Spicy, refreshing, and just in time for Father’s Day!

 

July – Maple Brown Ale

What’s more Canadian than beer and maple syrup? Enjoy pure maple syrup balanced against the sweet malty notes of our classic Brown Ale (and be sure to check out all our Canada Day festivities as Black Creek celebrates Canada 150).

 

August – Simcoe Hopped Ale

Brewed in honour of Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe, this ale features the distinctive pine-citrus notes of Simcoe hops, a classic dual-purpose hop from the Pacific Northwest. Start your August Long Weekend off right!

 

September – Fresh Hop/Wet Hop Pale Ale

Summer’s ending, and the hops are finally ripe! Take home this beer made with hops from Black Creek’s very own vines. This beer can only be made when the hops are ready, so don’t miss out!

Ready for harvesting!

 

October – Potato Stout, Honey Brown Ale, Pumpkin Ale

A triple threat! Enjoy the roasted, earthy notes of our Potato Stout, the warm sweetness of our Honey Brown Ale, and of course – that perennial favourite – our Pumpkin Ale! (We know you all love the Pumpkin Ale, so Ed usually does several brews of it – all with real pumpkin and spice.)

 

November – Gingerbread Stout

Ah, this is one of my personal favourites (stout and ginger, where can you do wrong?). Molasses and spices make this a lovely wintertime treat as we get ready for our festive season!

 

December – Winter Warmer

The end already? Our Winter Warmer will keep you cozy on those cold December nights. An amber ale brewed with coriander and bitter orange peel to a strength of 6.5%, this ale makes the season even brighter. 🙂

 

Can’t wait to see these release throughout the year! Remember, our specialty beers tend to vanish fairly quickly, so drop by the brewery promptly to avoid disappointment!

To Queen and Country!

Katie

Leave a comment

Filed under New Brew

Beer Flaws

Down in the Black Creek Brewery, we frequently said, “Beer is a very personal thing! There’s no right or wrong answer, only the beer that’s right for you!” While I wholeheartedly believe this is true, there is an aspect of beer that rarely came up in brewery conversations: beer faults.

That’s right. While preferences on style, flavour, and aroma are largely dependent on personal palates, it is possible to have beer that is—from a purely objective standpoint—flawed.

What makes beer taste bad? Sometimes, faults in beer arise from poor sanitation or infection (this was particularly a problem in the Victorian age). Sometimes, the ingredients are poor quality, stale, or improperly stored. Maybe something went wrong in the brewing process.

Victorian breweries didn’t have modern standards of sanitation…

 

Or maybe the recipe itself wasn’t very good (we’ve all eaten baked goods gone wrong—the same principle applies to brewing). Perhaps the wrong ingredients in the wrong quantities were used; or maybe the brewing method wasn’t followed correctly; or maybe a brewer let their creativity and zest for experimentation run too wild.

(A beer that will forever remain etched in my memory is a “Choc Lobster Porter.” Chocolate and lobster do not go together. The best I can say about that beer is that it makes a really good story now.)

Even if a perfectly good beer leaves the brewery, it can still pick up flaws before you drink it: improper storage, age, exposure to heat and/or light, and even dirty draught lines can all create undesirable flavours.

So that’s why a beer might have faults. But what are some common flaws?

#

Green Apple

This is a very common one. If you’re detecting an odd, green apple flavour in your beer, you’re tasting the result of acetaldehyde. This compound is actually a precursor to sugars becoming alcohol. In small quantities, it can be perceived as a simple fruity note, but a large presence usually means the beer needs more aging.

Astringency

Astringency isn’t just bitterness. It’s an over-steeped-black-tea flavour and sensation. Unsurprisingly, astringency in beer comes from tannins. In brewing, astringency can result from over-steeping and/or over-sparging the malt, or mashing with water that’s too hot. In some cases, it can also result from bacterial infections.

Cheese/Feet

Mmmm, delicious! You’re smelling/tasting isovaleric acid, resulting from poorly stored, oxidized hops.

Skunk

Ever wonder why so many beer bottles are brown? It’s to avoid this fault. When the iso alpha acids in hops react with light, it creates a flavour incredibly similar to a skunk’s odour. It’s quite common in beers stored in clear or green glass bottles. To avoid “light-struck” beer, stick to brown glass, draught beer, or cans.

Metal

Does your beer taste like you’re licking an aluminium can? A metallic taste in beer is a fault that results from old, improperly maintained equipment and/or poor-quality water.

Water quality greatly affects beer. Here is Joseph Bloore’s brewery in the Rosedale ravine, painted by R. Baigent , 1865 (www.torontopubliclibrary.ca)

Butter

Beer and popcorn can be a good combination, but you don’t want your beer tasting like popcorn.  If your beer is slick on the tongue and tastes like a movie theatre, you’ve got excessive diacetyl. This is a natural by-product of fermentation: a little can be all right, but too much is unpleasant. Usually, high levels are found in beer that’s been rushed out or beer fermented with weak yeast. However, it can be caused by dirty draught lines.

Paper/Wet cardboard

Beers’ flavours change as they age. If you’re getting cardboard, your beer is probably old and overly-oxidized.

Nail Polish Remover

Yeast gives off esters as it ferments: the resulting ethyl acetate can be responsible for a slight fruitiness…or harsh acetone flavours. Beer that tastes like solvent indicates poor handling, though it can result from low-quality, plastic brewing equipment.

Mouldy/Musky

We all know bread goes mouldy. And we all know that beer and bread are made of similar ingredients. Mouldy, musky beer may indicate the presence of mould in the grain or casks. It may also arise from dirty draught lines.

#

Fortunately, a good brewer using quality ingredients in a clean environment (like our brewmaster Ed!) will avoid most of these faults. But learning to detect flaws is just another part of educating one’s palate. Beer is still down to personal taste—but knowing standards of flavour can help beer-lovers make even more informed choices about their brews. 🙂

To Queen and Country!

Katie

Leave a comment

Filed under Craft Beer

Interview with a Beer Writer (Me!)

Our Interview Series continues! As some of you may know, I’ve been administering this blog since 2013. In four years, I have written many articles on brewing, sampled many beers, and done my best to share that knowledge with you!

And so, I thought it would be fun to try something different for this interview. I’m stepping out from behind the curtain and interviewing myself! Besides writing this blog, I’m also one of Black Creek’s History Actors and an award-winning author. I’ve spoken about beer and brewing history at conventions across the United States and Canada, and historically-accurate beer regularly appears in my fiction. And so, without further ado, here I am!

Presentation for the Baltimore Science Fiction Society, 2014.

KT: As you know, I love origin stories. Everyone has a different reason for getting into beer—what’s yours?

KT: Ironically, for the longest time, I thought that I didn’t like beer. But what was I drinking at 19? Some Molson, some Sleeman—lighter beers that don’t really suit my palate. I didn’t realize this, however, so I continued in denial until my first year working at Black Creek Pioneer Village. Somehow, I heard that the brewery needed an extra pair of hands for our Christmas by Lamplight event. Since I had my SmartServe certification from a previous job, I volunteered to help out. One thing led to another, and…

I fell in love. From the moment I set foot in the brewery, I fell completely, utterly, hopelessly in love with it. The space captured my heart immediately: this cosy, tucked-away corner of the village with its gleaming brew-kettle and proudly standing casks. The history and technical aspects of brewing fascinated me – forgive the pun, but that first taste awakened a raging thirst for more knowledge. And so, I spent the next 18 months or so learning about beer on my own, preparing myself in case there was another opening in the brewery.

There was. The rest is history.

I’m still in love.

KT: How has your palate changed, over the years?

KT: How hasn’t it changed? Remember: I thought I didn’t like beer, so I resisted drinking it at first. Fortunately, I had our wonderful brewmaster Ed to tutor me. He led through different beer styles: explaining their characteristics and giving recommendations on what to try. I started out really enjoying IPAs—the hoppier the better. I think it’s because the aggressive, sharp bitterness of a hop-oriented beer was immediately apparent to my immature palate in ways that the rich, deep malt flavours of a stout weren’t.

But gradually, I shifted to the dark side. I’ve always been a fan of dark chocolate and black coffee, so my fondness for dark beers makes sense—I just needed to work up to them.

Mmmm, stout.

Mmmm, stout.

KT: Of all the things you’ve learned about beer, what is your favourite?

KT: Well, I do really like being able to give tasting notes. That’s a cool skill, and one I’ve worked hard to develop. I’ve spent a lot of time training my palate and learning the vocabulary. At time of writing, I’ve got well over 400 different beers logged in my database. This is another instance where I was so grateful to work with Ed: he taught me how to approach beers, examining the colour and appearance, before taking in the aroma and that all-important first sip. It takes practice to train your palate to detect different flavours, and further practice to learn how to describe those sensations in a way that makes sense.

I was also amazed to learn just how important beer was to Canada’s history, and how much beer history is still hidden all around us in Toronto. Culture, politics, nutrition, gender roles, industry…beer touches so many different aspects of our lives, and it’s fascinating to see those connections draw together.

KT: You’re also an author. How has beer impacted your fiction?

KT: In my stories, my beer is always historically accurate, so there is that. I’m also able to describe flavour and aroma with precision – it’s those sensory details that make stories come alive. On a deeper level, though, I’ve been most impacted by the notion that beer touches many different aspects of our lives. My fiction leans towards the historical (I can’t imagine why), and I know how important taverns and beer culture were to Victorian society. And so, taverns tend to occupy a central place in my fiction as well – just as they were deeply interwoven into the society about which I write.

See, while I’m an artist, I’m also an educator. And so, I’m still drawing those connections between beer, culture, politics, et al., as much as I did in the brewery. I’m just doing it through a different form of art.

#

And there you have it: a  behind-the-scenes look at your favourite beer journalist! Thanks, beer-lovers!

To Queen and Country!

Katie

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

The Red Lion Inn: An Early Local Pub

Welcome, beer-lovers! This week at the Black Creek Growler, we’re delving into another chapter of Toronto’s beer history: the Red Lion Inn!

You can’t get very far into researching Toronto taverns without running across the Red Lion. It was built somewhere between 1808-1810 by Daniel Thiers. Like Black Creek Pioneer Village’s Stong family, Thiers was of Pennsylvania German origin, settling in Upper Canada in the late 1700s.

The Red Lion, ca. 1888. (courtesy Toronto Public Library)

The Red Lion sat on Yonge St, just north of modern-day Bloor (near the Toronto Reference Library today). When Thiers built the Red Lion, the area was still quite undeveloped—Toronto grew largely northward and westward from the lake. However, it was already an important crossroads: Davenport, Yonge, and Bloor were all established travel routes, and seemed likely to become even more heavily-travelled as the young city grew.

The inn itself was always large: its façade was about 100 feet along Yonge St. As wings and extensions were added, it eventually encompassed a two-acre site—including its outbuildings and yards. And of course, it had a sign emblazoned with a red lion rampant.

The bar area: 1912 painting based on an 1888 sketch. (Courtesy Toronto Public Library)

In the early days, the Red Lion served as a stopping point for travellers, particularly for farmers taking their goods from Holland Landing to York. An 1808 advertisement states Thier’s intention to open a public house, selling, “…[the] best strong beer at 8d, New York currency, per gallon, if drank in his house, and 2s 6d New York currency if taken out.”

(A few things to note about this: first, we can see the absolute mishmash of currency that pervaded the colony during this period. Second, takeaway beer is more expensive than beer drunk in-house—perhaps a tactic to get patrons to settle in, order more pints, and eventually take a room for the night?)

In his Landmarks of Toronto (1894), publisher-politician John Ross Robertson imagines what the Red Lion Inn might have been like: “…bronzed farmers, patriotic reformers, intriguing politicians, bright eyed girls, and spruce young men—all classes that made up the society of York and its environs.” Contemplating the ballroom, he writes, “Perhaps here many a maiden breathed that wonderful ‘Yes.’”

The ballroom, ca. 1888. (Courtesy Toronto Public Library)

While his tone is a touch sentimental—even by Victorian standards—it’s clear that he considered the Red Lion Inn a focal point for the community. Indeed, it proved to be the nucleus around which Yorkville developed (ably assisted by Joseph Bloor, as we learned here).

In addition to facilitating socialization, the Red Lion also played an important role in civic life. It was used for polling and political debates, and Reformers met there frequently through the 1830s—including William Lyon Mackenzie itself. After his expulsion from the legislature in 1831, a by-election was held at the Red Lion Inn. Following the vote, a triumphant Mackenzie greeted his supporters in the ballroom, receiving a medal and making a speech before leading a procession into town.

But alas, the good times could not last forever. The Temperance movement did not treat the Red Lion Inn kindly. After a series of struggles, it closed in 1892. Two years later, Robertson wrote, “Most of the characters who figured in the Red Lion’s history have gone over to the great majority, and soon the old inn will follow the course of all mundane things.”

The Red Lion Inn, ca. 1885. (Courtesy Toronto Public Library)

Sadly, he was right, for no trace of the Red Lion remains today. Yet it remains in memory, “The Most Famous Hostelry in the Annals of York.”

To Queen and Country!

Katie

PS. Keen for more? You can read a digitized version of John Ross Robertson’s Landmarks of Toronto here!

Leave a comment

Filed under Toronto History

Recipe: Boston Beer-Baked Beans

Greetings, beer-lovers!

As we discussed not long ago, one of beer’s many wonderful qualities is its versatility! Here at the Black Creek Growler, we do enjoy cooking with our beer. Although this didn’t happen that frequently in the 1800s, beer adds some pep to modern-day recipes!

And so, I embarked on a quest for Boston Beer-Baked Beans.  As usual for me, I combined several recipes based on availability of ingredients and my preferences. Now, without further ado:

Boston Beer-Baked Beans (Vegetarian)

  • 1 can beans (they’re meant to be navy beans, but I only had mixed beans)
  • ½ cup beer (not dark)
  • 1 medium chopped onion (I had two teeny onions)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/3 cup ketchup
  • 3 Tbsp molasses
  • 2 tsp Worcestershire sauce
  • Drizzle olive oil
  • ½ tsp paprika
  • ¼ tsp cayenne pepper (or to taste)
  • ¼ tsp black pepper.
Ingredients assembled!

Ingredients assembled!

Let’s talk about the beer. According to most recipes I found, most light beers will work. Personally, I’d go for something a little hoppier and more bitter, to cut through the molasses’ thickness and sweetness. So probably a pale ale, as opposed to a light lager. Being lighter in flavour generally, pale ales also balance nicely with most recipes.

Ideally, of course, I’d be using Ed’s Pale Ale, brewed at the Black Creek Brewery. Alas, it is March, not July, and so I had none to hand. I compromised by using Molson’s 1908 Historic Pale Ale. It’s an unfiltered beer based on a recipe from 1908. I mean, it’s not an 1830s recipe, but it’s a perfectly serviceable pale ale. Which, in this context, I count as high praise.

fullsizerender_1

Anyway, once the ingredients are assembled, the recipe is simple:

  • Drain and rinse beans
  • Combine other ingredients in a large bowl
  • Mix beans in
  • Bake uncovered at 350°F until most liquid is absorbed: about 40 minutes.
All mixed and ready for baking.

All mixed and ready for baking!

It smelled really, really good while baking. Like, the molasses aroma definitely filled my apartment, but I could get hints of beer underneath. It reminded me of being in the brewery while Ed’s boiling the wort.

I wasn’t sure if I’d overdone the baking, but the result tasted good! Sweet and savoury, with the beer’s sharpness cutting through and adding a lovely counterweight. Paired with some corn bread, it’s definitely something I’d make again…ideally, with Ed’s Pale Ale (or maybe his IPA—I bet the citrus flavours would give it a nice zing!).

img_7847 fullsizerender_5

fullsizerender_4

Until next time, beer-lovers!

Katie

Leave a comment

Filed under Historic Recipes

March Break Mystery Fun!

It’s that time of year again! Black Creek Pioneer Village has been hopping this March Break as our Junior Detectives (of all ages) help Sherlock Holmes solve the Maple Mystery. It is truly a sticky situation—sap-otage of the worst kind!

The Black Creek Brewery, alas, opens on April 29th. But there’s no reason we can’t join the March Break fun! I’ve paired some of our March Break characters with our Black Creek brews.

Sherlock Holmes: Best Bitter

Our super sleuth! At Black Creek Pioneer Village, Holmes is always affable and keen to see his favourite Junior Detectives. Our smooth, easy-drinking Best Bitter is a perfect match: like Holmes himself, it’s a sure-fire crowd-pleaser. Add its classic English hops, and it’s a pairing too good to pass up!

 

Our dynamic duo needs your help!

 

Dr. Watson: Pale Ale

Of course, Watson is Holmes’ partner-in-detection, so I wanted a beer somewhat similar. Watson has a bit more dryness to him, though—which is why I’ve chosen our Pale Ale for him. It’s another easy-drinking summer beer, but with more hop character and fruit aromas: the perfect brew for this dapper gent!

Miss Moriarty: Russian Imperial Stout

For Miss Moriarty (Professor Moriarty’s sister, you know!), I had to go outside our brews at Black Creek, but she fits a Russian Imperial Stout perfectly. Acerbic and elegant by turns, she has a mysterious past and…um, a way with words. This pitch-black beer matches her heart, it can land you in trouble quite quickly, and has endless depth and subtlety.

 

Professor Moriarty: Milk Stout

As siblings, Professor and Miss Moriarty have a lot of similarities, which is why I wanted to stay in the stout family. But Professor Moriarty is more charming upfront: much like the milk stout gives you a rush of sweetness and smoothness. For both the Professor and the Milk Stout, bitter dark notes come later. 😉

Mrs. Stong: Maple Brown

The matriarch of the Stong family and a pillar of Black Creek’s community: Mrs. Stong is the victim of this year’s crime. Her prized maple syrup was dumped out the night before an important maple syrup competition! And so, in honour of her struggle, I’ve chosen our Maple Brown Ale. Like Mrs. Stong, it’s solid and down-to-earth, with a decidedly sweet character.

#

So what do you think? There is still plenty of time to visit Black Creek, solve the mystery, and see what you think of these pairings. Our March Break Mystery Fun goes until March 19th, and kids get in free!

See you there!

Katie

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Events