News and Reviews on our Pale Ale


Black Creek Historic Brewery’s Pale Ale launched in the LCBO late last month, and the reviews are beginning to come in.  Slavster over at What I Drink At Home enjoyed it so much he gave it a 9 out 10 and there’s been a lot of buzz over at the Bar Towel where members have been reviewing the beer here.  Check out what some of our fans have to say, and let us know what you think!

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6 thoughts on “News and Reviews on our Pale Ale

  1. It’s great! Really happy with the ipa’s coming from craft brewery’s in Ontario recently. Who can I contact to inquire about jobs at your brewery? Would love to work for a craft brewery one day.

    Cheers!

  2. Just having one. Nice, real nice. Creamy head and lots of bitterness. I am not a hop head and this is well balanced. If this is what they drank 100 years ago, take me back in time!!!

  3. This beer is absolutely fantastic! Being a hop lover, this beer really hits home for me. It’s bursting with fresh hop flavour and a crisp balance to the malt. It has beautiful golden-copper colour, and being natural and unfiltered, great clarity as well. I can’t wait to get home after work to crack one of these open and take in that incredible hop aroma. Have you been growing your own hops on the property? I read somewhere that the goal was to eventually grow the barley and hops on the property or at least very close to it. I love the idea! Localization, the way it used to be.
    I’m no expert, but I’m going to guess Chinook hops? I’ve just started brewing from all grain after doing extract & grain batches and the whole process fascinates me. I can’t wait to sign up to brew with you this summer. Keep up the great work!

    1. Hi Jeff, thanks for the great review! We actually use a mix of four different American hops in our commercial brew in an attempt to represent the way ales would have been brewed in the 1860s. Traditionally, big breweries mixed Canadian, American and British hops (depending on what was available) when brewing. This was for a few different reasons, one being to save money (Canadian and American hops were usually cheaper) and another for face (English hops were considered by the public to be of superior quality). By mixing the three, the breweries could save some money while still saying their ale was brewed “with English hops”! I’ll ask Ed which varieties he’s using. At Black Creek Pioneer Village, we’re only into our second year of growing hops. Last year we managed two wet hop pale ale brews from our own hops. This year we’re hoping to harvest more hops to do a few more batches, but until we figure out how to oast our own, we won’t be able to brew with our own hops all year! We are also growing barley onsite in hopes of brewing a 100metre beer in September/October. We look forward to having you in to apprentice with Ed!

  4. I tried your Pale Ale at the Wine show and I loved it, great hop aroma and flavor. I was told by the very knowledgeable historic brew guy that the beer was being served early and the hops would mellow out…. well, I purchased some from the LCBO and he was right, they have mellowed. While it is still a great beer, I preferred drinking it “green” as it was served at the wine show. Ontario is FINALLY putting out some nice beers with some hop character and I love what you guys are doing. I will be stopping by the brewery this summer for sure. Keep it up … i’m looking forward to drinking your 100 metre beer. (i’m growing hops myself, but growing your own barley is bold…. ) CHEERS!

    1. Thanks Sean, that knowledgeable historic brew guy was Ed our Brewmaster, who should know the beer better than anyone else! If you’re a real hop head, you should mark September on your calendar and make sure you stop by the brewery at Black Creek Pioneer Village for our Wet Hop Pale Ale. This batch is brewed with freshly harvested hops grown at Black Creek Pioneer Village, and was a huge hit last year. What kind of hops are you growing?

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